10 Highest Paying Jobs & Career Paths

Also see: Top Ten Highest Paying Jobs In Business

One of the most popular requests we get is for information about the best paying jobs and the most profitable careers to go into. According to the U.S. Labor Department, here are the top ten career tracks you can take if salary is your highest priority.

1. Surgeon

If you don’t mind spending ten to fifteen years of your life training to perform invasive medical procedures, save lives, and perhaps even lose some, becoming a surgeon is for you. It is best to become specialized in a specific field of surgery (ex. heart surgeon, brain surgeon, etc…) A top surgeon can earn at least six figures a year if he or she can afford the liability insurance.

2. Anesthesiologist

It makes sense that the number 2 highest paying job works along the surgeon, which hold number one spot. An anesthesiologist administers precise amounts of anesthetics, a pharmacutical agent that causes the patient a local or general loss of sensation. The training required to become an anesthesiologist requires 12 years of nearly perfect grade point averages. The average anesthesiologist earns well over six figures and there is an unlimited availability to surgeons.

3. Obstetrician/Gynocologist

It takes a special kind of person to deliver babies and attend to women’s needs. An obstetrician/gynocologist faces massive liabilities, as the responsibility of assisting women through childbirth, disease, and various malfunctions of their anatomy is a huge undertaking. The training required for such feats is 12 years following high school graduation with the requirement of a grade point average of at least 3.5 and another 3 to 11 years of residency depending upon specialization within the field.

4. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon

An oral and maxillofacial surgeon operates on the craniomaxillofacial complex or the mouth, jaws, face, and skull. Duties include treating head and neck cancer known as microvascular reconstruction, cosmetic facial surgery, craniofacial surgery, pediatric maxillofacial susrgery, and crainiomadillofacial trauama. To become an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, one must complete 12 years of post high school educations with an additional one or two years of specialization.

5. Internist

An internist is a run of the mill type of physician who diagnoses, manages, and treats unusual, chronic, or serious diseases who does not perform surgery. Internists are essentially primary care providers who assist, inform, and treat male and female patients with preventative medicine, health issues, substance abuse, mental health, and common problems within the ears, eyes, skin, nervous system, or reproductive organs. Training to become an internist varies, requiring 8 years of college with an additional 3-11 years of specialization.

6. Prosthodontist

A prosthodontist is a dentist who specializes in esthetic and reconstructive dentistry through Prosthodontists the specialty of esthetic and reconstructive dentistry. Prosthodontists create dentures, crowns, implants, and recreate missing teeth and maxillofacial tissue with “biocompatible substitutes.”of braces.

7. Orthodontist

An orthodontist straightens crooked smiles and jaws through the use of braces, head gear, retainers, and other torturous devices. Through the use of Xrays, molds, and impressions, an orthodontist studies and treats malocclusion. An orthodontist trains for at least 9 years, depending upon field of specialization and certification requirements.

8. Psychiatrist

A psychiatrist studies disorders of the mind by diagnosing and treating emotional and cognitive dysfunction. A psychiatrist employs a combination of pychology, medicine, biology, biochemistry, and pharmacology. A psychiatrist’s job is perhaps one of the most difficult to do. Psychiatrists must, in order to do their job well, establish a relationship of trust with patients through inpatient and outpatient treatment all while following a strict code of ethics.

9. Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

The highest paid head of a business, company or organization is the CEO. He or she is responsible for the management of a company and generally answers only to a board of trustees if one is established. The onus of all business issues generally falls on a CEO but the position does have its perks.

10. Engineering Manager

An Engineering Manager requires a well rounded business background with knowledge in accounting, economy, financial management, industrial management, human resources, industrial psychology, mathematical modeling and optimization, quality control, and environmental program management. An Engineering Manager requires at least a bachelor’s degree if not a masters or PhD plus additional training regarding specialization.
References: 2008 U.S. Labor Department Report

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